15 04, 2014
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Nineteenth-Century Nuts: The Anatomy of a Victorian Lad’s Mag (Part 1)

By |April 15th, 2014|Featured, History|4 Comments

Nineteenth-Century Nuts The Anatomy of a Victorian Lad's Mag It’s all gone tits up. Nuts, the beleaguered lads’ mag, has finally cracked under the twin pressures of outrage (from those who didn't read it) and indifference (from those who once did). As a Guardian-reading feminist I should probably be quite glad to see it go, but the historian in me feels a pang of sadness. I work on the history of popular newspapers and magazines, so whenever a long-running publication closes its doors I feel compelled to mourn its passing. Even when the odious News of the World went to joing the great newsagent in the sky I couldn't bring myself to celebrate the death of a 160 year old publication, no matter how toxic it had become. Nuts doesn't have anything like this kind of history, but its death still feels like the end of an era. Front magazine closed its doors in February, the company behind Penthouse filed for bankruptcy last Autumn, and the circulation figures of most other men's magazines are in freefall. Now that one of the genre's flagship publications has sunk, titles like Zoo, FHM and Loaded seem sure to follow. For better or worse, the lad's mag is on its last legs. I was seventeen [...]

12 04, 2014
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Talk: Digital Detectives – Bridging the Gap Between the Archive and the Classroom

By |April 12th, 2014|Digitisation, Featured, Teaching|4 Comments

Title: 'Digital Detectives - Bridging the Gap Between the Archive and the Classroom' Event: Digital Literacies - Building Learning Communities in the Humanities, HEA Arts & Humanities Workshop, Liverpool John Moores University, 2 April 2014. Hashtag: #DigitalLiteracies // Storify Notes: Last week I attended a brilliant HEA workshop organised by @DrHorrocks. In my presentation I spoke about my recent attempts to integrate digital research into my undergraduate teaching. I outlined how we can use digital archives to transform undergraduate history students into empowered producers, rather than just passive consumers, of research.  If you're interested in learning more about the 'Digital Detectives' model of undergraduate history teaching then please get in touch - I offer talks and practical workshops for history departments that would like to make better use of their digital resources. I didn't write out a script for this presentation - the text below is a rough approximation of what I said on the day, accompanied by some of my powerpoint slides. I have also added some student feedback data, which was not available at the time of the presentation. About 5 years ago, when I first started teaching, I led a small seminar group of 1st year history students. [...]